Tag Archives: Dash

There’s a new Dash!

Dash: an open source, community approach to data publication

We have great news! Last week we refreshed our Dash data publication service.  For those of you who don’t know, Dash is an open source, community driven project that takes a unique approach to data publication and digital preservation.

Dash focuses on search, presentation, and discovery and delegates the responsibility for the data preservation function to the underlying repository with which it is integrated. It is a project based at the University of California Curation Center (UC3), a program at California Digital Library (CDL) that aims to develop interdisciplinary research data infrastructure.

Dash employs a multi-tenancy user interface; providing partners with extensive opportunities for local branding and customization, use of existing campus login credentials, and, importantly, offering the Dash service under a tenant-specific URL, an important consideration helping to drive adoption. We welcome collaborations with other organizations wishing to provide a simple, intuitive data publication service on top of more cumbersome legacy systems.

There are currently seven live instances of Dash: – UC BerkeleyUC IrvineUC MercedUC Office of the PresidentUC RiversideUC Santa CruzUC San FranciscoONEshare (in partnership with DataONE)

Architecture and Implementation

Dash is completely open source. Our code is made publicly available on GitHub (http://cdluc3.github.io/dash/). Dash is based on an underlying Ruby-on-Rails data publication platform called Stash. Stash encompasses three main functional components: Store, Harvest, and Share.

  • Store: The Store component is responsible for the selection of datasets; their description in terms of configurable metadata schemas, including specification of ORCID and Fundref identifiers for researcher and funder disambiguation; the assignment of DOIs for stable citation and retrieval; designation of an optional limited time embargo; and packaging and submission to the integrated repository
  • Harvest: The Harvest component is responsible for retrieval of descriptive metadata from that repository for inclusion into a Solr search index
  • Share: The Share component, based on GeoBlacklight, is responsible for the faceted search and browse interface

Dash Architecture Diagram

Individual dataset landing pages are formatted as an online version of a data paper, presenting all appropriate descriptive and administrative metadata in a form that can be downloaded as an individual PDF file, or as part of the complete dataset download package, incorporating all data files for all versions.

To facilitate flexible configuration and future enhancement, all support for the various external service providers and repository protocols are fully encapsulated into pluggable modules. Metadata modules are available for the DataCite and Dublin Core metadata schemas. Protocol modules are available for the SWORD 2.0 deposit protocol and the OAI-PMH and ResourceSync harvesting protocols. Authentication modules are available for InCommon/Shibboleth and Google/OAuth19 identity providers (IdPs). We welcome collaborations to develop additional modules for additional metadata schemas and repository protocols. Please email UC3 (uc3 at ucop dot edu) or visit GitHub (http://cdluc3.github.io/dash/) for more information.

Features of the newly refreshed Dash service

What are the new features on our refresh of the Dash services?  Take a look.

Feature Tech-focused User-focused Description
Open Source X All components open source, MIT licensed code (http://cdluc3.github.io/dash/)
Standards compliant X Dash integrates with any SWORD/OAI-PMH-compliant repository
Pluggable Framework X Inherent extensibility for supporting additional protocols and metadata schemas
Flexible metadata schemas X Support Datacite metadata schema out-of-the-box, but can be configured to support any schema
Innovation X Our modular framework will make new feature development easier and quicker
Mobile/responsive design X X Built mobile-first, from the ground up, for better user experience
Geolocation – Metadata X X For applicable research outputs, we have an easy to use way to capture location of your datasets
Persistent Identifers – ORCID X X Dash allows researchers to attach their ORCID, allowing them to track and get credit for their work
Persistent Identifers – DOIs X X Dash issues DOIs for all datasets, allowing researchers to track and get credit for their work
Persistent Identifers – Fundref X X Dash tracks funder information using FundRef, allowing researchers and funders to track their reasearch outputs
Login – Shibboleth /OAuth2 X X We offer easy single-sign with your campus credentials or Google account
Versioning X X Datasets can change. Dash offers a quick way for you to upload new versions of your datasets and offer a simple process for tracking updates
Accessibility X X The technology, design, and user workflows have all been built with accessibility in mind
Better user experience X Self-depositing made easy. Simple workflow, drag-and-drop upload, simple navigation, clean data publication pages, user dashboards
Geolocation – Search X With GeoBlacklight, we can offer search by location
Robust Search X Search by subject, filetype, keywords, campus, location, etc.
Discoverability X Indexing by search engines for Google, Bing, etc.
Build Relationships X Many datasets are related to publications or other data. Dash offers a quick way to describe these relationships
Supports Best Practices X Data publication can be confusing. But with Dash, you can trust Dash is following best practices
Data Metrics X See the reach of your datasets through usage and download metrics
Data Citations X Quick access to a well-formed citiation reference (with DOI) to every data publication. Easy for your peers to quickly grab
Open License X Dash supports open Creative Commons licensing for all data deposits; can be configured for other licenses
Lower Barrier to Entry X For those in a hurry, Dash offers a quick interface to self-deposit. Only three steps and few required fields
Support Data Reuse X Focus researchers on describing methods and explaining ways to reuse their datasets
Satisfies Data Availability Requirements X Many publishers and funders require researchers to make their data available. Dash is an readily accepted and easy way to comply

A little Dash history

The Dash project began as DataShare, a collaboration among UC3, the University of California San Francisco Library and Center for Knowledge Management, and the UCSF Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). CTSI is part of the Clinical and Translational Science Award program funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. Dash version 2 developed by UC3 and partners with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (our funded proposal). Read more about the code, the project, and contributing to development on the Dash GitHub site.

A little Dash future

We will continue the development of the new Dash platform and will keep you posted. Next up: support for timed deposits and embargoes.  Stay tuned!

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Dash Project Receives Funding!

We are happy to announce the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has funded our project to improve the user interface and functionality of our Dash tool! You can read the full grant text at http://escholarship.org/uc/item/2mw6v93b.

More about Dash

Dash is a University of California project to create a platform that allows researchers to easily describe, deposit and share their research data publicly. Currently the Dash platform is connected to the UC3 Merritt Digital Repository; however, we have plans to make the platform compatible with other repositories using protocols during our Sloan-funded work. The Dash project is open-source; read more on our GitHub site. We encourage community discussion and contribution via GitHub Issues.

Currently there are five instances of the Dash tool available:

We plan to launch the new DataONE Dash instance in two weeks; this tool will replace the existing DataUp tool and allow anyone to deposit data into the DataONE infrastructure via the ONEShare repository using their Google credentials. Along with the release of DataONE Dash, we will release Dash 1.1 for the live sites listed above. There will be improvements to the user interface and experience.

The Newly Funded Sloan Project

Problem Statement

Researchers are not archiving and sharing their data in sustainable ways. Often data sharing involves using commercially owned solutions, posting data on personal websites, or submitting data alongside articles as supplemental material. A better option for data archiving is community repositories, which are owned and operated by trusted organizations (i.e., institutional or disciplinary repositories). Although disciplinary repositories are often known and used by researchers in the relevant field, institutional repositories are less well known as a place to archive and share data.

Why aren’t researchers using institutional repositories?

First, the repositories are often not set up for self-service operation by individual researchers who wish to deposit a single dataset without assistance. Second, many (or perhaps most) institutional repositories were created with publications in mind, rather than datasets, which may in part account for their less-than-ideal functionality. Third, user interfaces for the repositories are often poorly designed and do not take into account the user’s experience (or inexperience) and expectations. Because more of our activities are conducted on the Internet, we are exposed to many high-quality, commercial-grade user interfaces in the course of a workday. Correspondingly, researchers have expectations for clean, simple interfaces that can be learned quickly, with minimal need for contacting repository administrators.

Our Solution

We propose to address the three issues above with Dash, a well-designed, user friendly data curation platform that can be layered on top of existing community repositories. Rather than creating a new repository or rebuilding community repositories from the ground up, Dash will provide a way for organizations to allow self-service deposit of datasets via a simple, intuitive interface that is designed with individual researchers in mind. Researchers will be able to document, preserve, and publicly share their own data with minimal support required from repository staff, as well as be able to find, retrieve, and reuse data made available by others.

Three Phases of Work

  1. Requirements gathering: Before the design process begins, we will build requirements for researchers via interviews and surveys
  2. Design work: Based on surveys and interviews with researchers (Phase 1), we will develop requirements for a researcher-focused user interface that is visually appealing and easy to use.
  3. Technical work: Dash will be an added-value data sharing platform that integrates with any repository that supports community protocols (e.g., SWORD (Simple Web-service Offering Repository Deposit).

The dash is a critical component of any good ascii art. By reddit user Haleljacob

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New Project: Citing Physical Spaces

A few months ago, the UC3 group was contacted by some individuals interested in solving a problem: how should we reference field stations? Rob Plowes from University of Texas/Brackenridge Field Lab emailed us:

I am on a [National Academy of Sciences] panel reviewing aspects of field stations, and we have been discussing a need for data archiving. One idea proposed is for each field station to generate a simple document with a DOI reference to enable use in publications that make reference to the field station. Having this DOI document would enable a standardized citation that could be tracked by an online data aggregator.

We thought this was a great idea and started having a few conversations with other groups (LTER, NEON, etc.) about its feasibility. Fast forward to two weeks ago, when Plowes and Becca Fenwick of UC Merced presented our more fleshed out idea to the OBFS/NAML Joint Meeting in Woods Hole, MA. (OBFS: Organization of Biological Field Stations, and NAML: National Association of Marine Laboratories). The response was overwhelmingly positive, so we are proceeding with the idea in earnest here at the CDL.

The intent of this blog post is to gather feedback from the broader community about our idea, including our proposed metadata fields, our plans for implementation, and whether there are existing initiatives or groups that we should be aware of and/or partner with moving forward.

In a Nutshell

Problem: Tracking publications associated with a field station or site is difficult. There is no clear or standard way to cite field station descriptions.

Proposal: Create individual, citable “publications” with associated persistent identifiers for each field station (more generically called a “site”). Collect these Site Descriptors in the general use DataONE repository, ONEShare. The user interface will be a new instance of the existing UC3 Dash service (under development) with some modifications for Site Descriptors.

What we need from you: 

Moving forward: We plan on gathering community feedback for the next few months, with an eye towards completing a pilot version of the interface by February 2015. We will be ramping up Dash development over the next 12 months thanks to recent funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and this development work will include creating a more robust version of the Site Descriptors database.

Project Partners:

  • Rob Plowes, UT Austin/Brackenridge Field Lab
  • Mark Stromberg, UC Berkeley/UC Natural Reserve System
  • Kevin Browne, UC Natural Reserve System Information Manager
  • Becca Fenwick, UC Merced
  • UC3 group
  • DataONE organization

Lovers Point Laboratory (1930), which was later renamed Hopkins Marine Laboratory. From Calisphere, contributed by Monterey County Free Libraries.

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